Wine Around the World 2017: Croatia Looks at Policy for Caring for the Aging

This series of blog posts by author Patti Digh will focus on aging in the countries whose wines we will taste at our Wine Around the World event on Thursday, October 12, 2017. Purchase tickets here! Wine Around the World 2017.

Creating National Policy on Caring for the Aging

In Croatia, a burgeoning elderly population and rapid socio-economic change have strained health services to the point where health care providers, policymakers, and citizens alike have begun to recognize an immediate need for alternative options for geriatric care–in a nation where geriatrics and gerontology have not yet evolved into recognized specialties.

There are not enough retirement homes, waiting lists are long, there are no hospices, there is no program to educate families in how to care for the elderly, there are no guidance centers. Home care is developing. Unfortunately, a major problem is an insolvent community that cannot contribute enough resources.

Croatia wants to address the issues of a growing aging population and the absence of a national policy on how to care for the aging. They want to look at alternative means of elder care: day care, assisted living, home care, and ways to move people out of hospitals.There are currently two options for residential elder care in Croatia: retirement homes, which provide assistance with activities of daily living and with administration of medications, and health and welfare institutes, which house those with chronic conditions. These facilities are funded through a combination of government welfare supplements and private pay; residents’ relatives are required to assist with payment when they are able to. The pressure to get into residential care facilities is intense. There are more than 10,000 people on waiting lists for these homes, and applicants often must wait up to three years for placement.

After visiting The Franciscan at St. Leonard in Centerville, Ohio, on an exchange recently, nursing home administrators conceived a plan to introduce adult day care to Croatia, resulting in the opening of a nursing home in Sibenik that provides three meals a day and a range of leisure activities–including painting, singing, dancing and playing cards–for elderly citizens.

Leave a Reply