Wine Around the World 2017: Creating futuristic answers to aging issues in France

This series of blog posts by author Patti Digh will focus on aging in the countries whose wines we will taste at our Wine Around the World event on Thursday, October 12, 2017. Purchase tickets here! Wine Around the World 2017.

Creating futuristic answers to aging issues in France

Traditionally, it is considered natural among the French for senior relatives to be cared for by the family. In accordance with the law, children are required to provide for their aging parents.

This, in particular, explains why old people’s homes and retirement homes are less common in France than in other Western countries. However, this has begun to change.

A recent survey in France confirms that 90 percent of people aged 50 or older would prefer to live in their own homes as long as possible. A quarter of those over 85, though, are already in some form of assisted living, which amounts to around 450,000 people.

One company is creating a technological approach to meeting those increasing needs: A robot called Kompaï, from France-based Robosoft, features a touch-screen display on an easel and a bowling ball–sized head with a “face.” Although the face is currently just for emotional comfort, future versions will light up and show expressions.

The vision for Kompaï is as follows: Family members would call the robot via Skype. The robot would then use ultrasonic sensors to detect the location of the person being called and navigate to that person, who answers the Skype video conference call via Kompaï’s multitouch tablet PC and Webcam. Kompaï could likewise be used as an interface to Facebook or some other social network. Interactive speech recognition would be available to help elderly or otherwise dependent people access the Internet using a simple graphic and tactile interface.

Kompaï could also store a person’s daily schedule and shopping lists, and access online calendars or weather. Robosoft is now being tested in hospitals, geriatric centers, and homes in France, Hungary and Austria to see how the technology is accepted.

Robosoft is looking to partner with companies that make wireless physiological sensors worn by a robot’s owner that could communicate blood pressure, pulse, body temperature and other data via Bluetooth to the robot, which would then relay that information to the person’s doctor.

In this way, the needs of France’s aging population might be met more efficiently.

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